The Internet is Like A Puddle by Shona Innes

Published: January 2015Goodreads badge
Publisher:
 Five Mile Press
Illustrator: Irisz Agocs
Pages: 40
Format: Hardcover Picture Book
★   ★   ★   ★   ★  – 5 Stars

The Internet is Like a Puddle attends to the wonderful aspects of electronic communication as well as gently discusses some of the possible pitfalls of sharing, chatting and using data. There is a need to be mindful of those who are naive to the potential problems without denying them the wonderful opportunities. The Internet is Like a Puddle describes ways to stay safe and enjoy learning and chatting time on the Internet and to keep life balanced.

In an age where toddlers can be more proficient navigating the internet than a lot of 40-year-olds, this book is a great introduction to the joys and pitfalls of using the internet. Innes looks at how the internet lets us do great things and we can access these things in many different ways whether it is on the computer or on phones. She compares the internet it to a puddle, fun to play in, can be used to play games and have fun, but puddle can be deceptive and tricky. This is a great analogy which works in teaching about water safety as a side benefit.

It’s a great educational book that clearly and simply explains how it’s easy to get in too deep when using the internet and how the deeper we go the more dangerous it can become. Innes always compares it back to stepping in puddles, and how that too can be dangerous without an adult there with help and guidance.

Agocs illustrations are cute animals playing in nature and with technology, with pictures matching with words for easy comprehension. This is a nonfiction book that reads like a story. It’s a great book for kids teaching them about using the internet for fun and in moderation. Innes never wants to deter children from playing on the internet, it’s impossible to avoid and can have many benefits; instead, she is trying to teach about safety in terms kids can understand. This is a must-read for all parents in this day and age where children have such easy access to the internet and when it’s so easy to get into trouble.

You can purchase The Internet is a Puddle via the following

Booktopia |  Amazon

Book Depository

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She Persisted by Chelsea Clinton

Published: 30th May 2017Goodreads badge
Publisher:
Philomel Books
Illustrator: Alexandra Boiger
Pages: 32
Format: Hardcover Picture Book
★   ★   ★   ★   ★  – 5 Stars

Throughout American history, there have always been women who have spoken out for what’s right, even when they have to fight to be heard. In early 2017, Senator Elizabeth Warren’s refusal to be silenced in the Senate inspired a spontaneous celebration of women who persevered in the face of adversity. In this book, Chelsea Clinton celebrates thirteen American women who helped shape our country through their tenacity, sometimes through speaking out, sometimes by staying seated, sometimes by captivating an audience. They all certainly persisted.

She Persisted is for everyone who has ever wanted to speak up but has been told to quiet down, for everyone who has ever tried to reach for the stars but was told to sit down, and for everyone who has ever been made to feel unworthy or unimportant or small.

When I first heard of this book I knew I needed to read it. I will also happily admit that I started tearing up when I was reminded of these important American women. I knew some of their stories, but some I hadn’t heard of. Clinton has told the story of these women in simple but important terms and includes one of their famous quotes.

She Persisted is an important story because it points out how these women persisted through their struggles, often when men told them they couldn’t, or when society tried to stop them. Clinton had written this in a way that not only highlights the great work that these women did through history, but she points out that when they were blocked (typically by men let’s admit it) they kept going, despite the hardship. I think that is an important lesson too, not just that these women did these remarkable things, but they ignored those who told them no.

One of the best inclusions is Claudette Colvin, an African American who refused to get up for a white woman on the bus. Clinton mentions this inspires Rosa Parkes, a few months later, but recognises Colvin was the first. There are thirteen remarkable women in this book: Harriett Tubman, Helen Keller, Clara Lemlich, Nellie Bly, Virginia Apgar, Maria Tallchief’s, Claudette Colvin, Ruby Bridges, Margaret Chase Smith, Sally Ride, Florence Griffith Joyner, Oprah Winfrey and Sonia Sotomayor. All who changed the world by never giving up on their dreams and doing what they felt was the right thing.

These stories of important historical women cover all kinds of professions of trailblazers and women who wouldn’t let other people tell them what they could and could not do. They persisted, and Clinton has made this book an important resource in teaching girls (and everyone) that no matter what they want to do, they shouldn’t let anyone tell them they can’t.

You can purchase She Persisted via the following

Wordery | BookWorld

Dymocks | QBD

Book Depository | Booktopia

The Nile | Fishpond

Little Koala Lost by Blaze Kwaymullina

Published: 1st July 2016Goodreads badge
Publisher:
 Scholastic Australia
Illustrator: Jess Racklyeft
Pages: 24
Format: Hardcover Picture Book
★   ★   ★  – 3 Stars

Little Koala is lost in the bush and sets out to find a home. Along the way he meets many other creatures, but he can’t live with any of them. Will he ever find some friends?

Not as cute as I first thought it would be, but still pretty cute. Little Koala Lost is about, as you would expect, a lost koala. In a counting style similar I guess to The Very Hungry Caterpillar the little koala visits animals in increasing numbers: two magpies, then three pelicans etc as it searches for someone to take him in.

The illustrations are beautiful, and the baby koala is adorable as it goes from animal group to animal group asking if they will let it join. It’s a simple story but sweet at the same time. The animals are nice enough to the koala, rejecting him not so much in a mean way because he’s “not one of them” but they give logical answers as to why they can’t take him in based on their different bodies and behaviours.

I was expecting a heart-warming story about a little lost koala and while it wasn’t as touching as I thought, it was still very sweet.

A Day with Dad by Bo R. Holmberg

Published: 22nd April 2008Goodreads badge
Publisher:
Candlewick Press
Illustrator: Eva Eriksson
Pages: 32
Format: Hardcover Picture Book
★   ★   ★   ★  – 4 Stars

Tim lives with his mom. Tim’s dad lives in another town. Tim doesn’t see him often. So a day with Dad is very special – and Tim wants to show just how must he loves him!

This is a great book about divorce/separation that doesn’t mention it outright but implies it and shows that even when parents live separately, time with an absent parent is still possible. More importantly, it demonstrates that just because parents don’t live together, it doesn’t mean that they stop loving their children.

From the text on page one it’s evident the separation is a new event as Tim has just moved to the new town. He waits for his dad to arrive on the train and looks forward to a day with just the two of them. Tim’s dad lets Tim take control of the day, you can tell he wants to make the day special for Tim and make sure he has fun. Tim and his dad pack a lot of activities into the day and it’s evident how much Tim loves his dad and he tells everyone they meet who he is.

The illustrations by Eriksson are realistic and heart warming as they depict the various activities Tim and his dad partake in during his visit. It reminds me very much of what Russell says in the Pixar film Up, that it’s the boring things he remembers most. And while Holmberg doesn’t write Tim’s day to be boring, it does show that simple activities like sitting silently reading side by side in the library can be the most enjoyable activity because he is with his dad.

I found this book to be very sweet and it’s ideal for letting young kids know that their parents love them and things can be a bit different but your dad will always be your dad.

You can purchase A Day With Dad via the following

Amazon | Book Depository

Booktopia | Dymocks

 

 

Library Lion by Michelle Knudsen

Published: 25th July 2006
Goodreads badgePublisher: Candlewick Press
Illustrator: Kevin Hawkes
Pages: 48
Format: Hardcover Picture Book
Genre: Children
★   ★   ★   ★   ★  – 5 Stars

Miss Merriweather, the head librarian, is very particular about rules in the library. No running allowed. And you must be quiet. But when a lion comes to the library one day, no one is sure what to do. There aren’t any rules about lions in the library. And, as it turns out, this lion seems very well suited to library visiting. His big feet are quiet on the library floor. He makes a comfy backrest for the children at story hour. And he never roars in the library, at least not anymore. But when something terrible happens, the lion quickly comes to the rescue in the only way he knows how.

I am a sucker for anything with a lion and I knew there was a book called Library Lion I just hadn’t come across it before. I found a copy at work and I sat down and read it right away and it did not disappoint.

I loved this book. It’s adorable and charming and so incredibly sweet. It’s not just a fantastic story, it’s also beautifully illustrated. I’m in love with Hawkes’ illustrations on top of being in love with Knudsen’s storytelling. I definitely need my own Library Lion, right now.

The story is about a lion who wanders into the library, originally causing a little chaos as he navigates his way around, but he then decides to stay for story time. After a rocky start and after given a talk about the rules of the library, he is soon beloved by the staff and the public and is an asset to the library in many ways.

I loved everything about this story. I loved the lion, he’s just gorgeous, and I love the staff for their quirkiness and attitudes. It’s a fun story but it is also filled with heart. Hawkes’ illustrations make it that much more divine; they are gorgeous and emotive. He captures the personality of the lion, the staff, and the public who come across him superbly.

You can use it as a lesson about following rules and breaking them, but it really is a great book on its own. There is no clear Message, but it can be drawn from it easily enough. I would, however, like to live in this world where a library can have a lion hang around. I didn’t know I could envy fictitious children in a picture book until now.

You can purchase Library Lion via the following

Book Depository | QBD

Booktopia | Dymocks

Fishpond | A&R Bookworld

Wordery |

 

 

 

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